Oompa

FFM49
The new recordings from Misha Mishenko and L.I.M.B. have been tagged as "experimental, IDM, left field, and breakcore." In truth, however, the idea here is to mock, not celebrate the assumed "uniqueness" of much modern Russian dance music. Mishenko has referred in one location to the "black humor" of these tracks - entitled "Oompa" - or to their "sarcastic" tone. These cutting inferences about presumed DIY brilliance and "independent" creativity overlap neatly with something else Mishenko said not long ago. In one interview he expressed admiration both for Thom Yorke and his conviction that inspired, enthused individuals have little or no need for a canonical musical education. Mishenko, however, quickly admitted that Yorke's view is something of an extreme, in that education offers artists not only additional creative tools, but also insurance within a fickle market. Why is such insurance needed? Because Mishenko perceives certain inevitabilities within modern Russian music. "The main goal for Russian musicians is to make a name for yourself. We've a strange marketplace here. You're not judged by the music you write, but by whom you know. Our domestic business consists of a very narrow group of people. It's hard to break in." The relationship between novelty and convention is dictated by a series of behavioral modes. Local creativity is fashioned by social norms - which themselves are seemingly guided by avarice. Cash shapes creativity. Hence the black humor of "Oompa," seemingly maligning both commercial predictability and any delusional states of self-determination.

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