Label

Various artists
FFM030
Opening track: Moscow composer Andrey Nailer was originally known to FFM as the pianist in Readmylife. Away from his bandmates, Nailer has tended to release individual tracks in an almost unnoticed fashion online. Nonetheless, his trademark, gentle melancholy still finds ardent admirers. One of his relatively recent instrumentals, for example, garnered three pointed comments, one after the other. Together they form a telling snapshot of his emotional clout: "This track makes me sad"; "What a beautiful melody"; "This really is sad. I can imagine a sunset, a cliff, and a solitary figure." In other words, a figure is imagined who embodies social retreat, reconsideration, and therefore future promise. * "Far from Moscow” is a project designed to aggregate songs and sounds (i.e., texts and tunes) over a very wide area. We also release regular compilations, dedicated to varied genres and digital material that might otherwise go unnoticed. These albums should help to slow the rate at which young and impressive performers move across the horizon. The same collections should also help to nurture new audiences, both at home and… far from Moscow. The tracks on display - this time! - come from Russia, Ukraine, Belarus, Latvia, and Lithuania. All were published during December 2012. Within each file you'll find photographic, geographic, and archival information concerning the artist or band in question
Various artists
FFM029
Opening track: Jack Wood. Unwilling at first to name their hometown, they have eventually admitted - over time - to residing somewhere near Tomsk, Siberia. These performers have voiced a generally dark view of local existence before. "The world is totally f***ed up. We're all dumped upon by a ton of information that we confuse with knowledge. We cannot distinguish between sufficiency and excess. Nor can we separate wealth from happiness." The failed ability to distinguish greed from satisfaction is a verbal one. Language, with its need to designate or categorize - and thus establish some gap between itself and actuality's plenitude - is a poor tool with which to consider social betterment. * "Far from Moscow” is a project designed to aggregate songs and sounds (i.e., texts and tunes) over a very wide area. We also release regular compilations, dedicated to varied genres and digital material that might otherwise go unnoticed. These albums should help to slow the rate at which young and impressive performers move across the horizon. The same collections should also help to nurture new audiences, both at home and… far from Moscow. The tracks on display - this time! - come from Russia, Ukraine, Estonia, and Belarus. All were published during November 2012. Within each file you'll find photographic, geographic, and archival information concerning the artist or band in question
Various artists
FFM028
Opening track: Evgenii Dowdy was raised in the town of Samara on the banks of the Volga. Now resident in Moscow, he was just invited by the Ritmo Sportivo collective to participate in their "Afterhours Sessions." As readers of this site know, these sessions are designed to give a young producer one night - working alone - in which to author some new tracks, tagging them with the hour and minute of their completion. When the sun rises, the musician stops. * "Far from Moscow” is a project designed to aggregate songs and sounds (i.e., texts and tunes) over a very wide area. We also release regular compilations, dedicated to varied genres and digital material that might otherwise go unnoticed. These albums should help to slow the rate at which young and impressive performers move across the horizon. The same collections should also help to nurture new audiences, both at home and… far from Moscow. The tracks on display - this time! - come from Russia, Ukraine, Latvia, and Kazakhstan. All were published during November 2012. Within each file you'll find photographic, geographic, and archival information concerning the artist or band in question
Various artists
FFM027
Opening track. A wonderful evocation of passage over fixed statement, of process over genre, has emerged this month in new recordings from Kobko, a young musician based in Novosibirsk. He also works under the name of Misha Dobryy. Although Kobko/Dobryy is unwilling to frame his audio work in long, involved, or verbal forms, some hints of his worldview do come through in briefer utterances. Even in a Twitter feed, for example, there are tiny signs of this love for transience and transformation. Several days ago, by way of quick illustration, there came the insistent claim that "jazz is the only thing I need right now." * "Far from Moscow” is a project designed to aggregate songs and sounds (i.e., texts and tunes) over a very wide area. We also release regular compilations, dedicated to varied genres and digital material that might otherwise go unnoticed. These albums should help to slow the rate at which young and impressive performers move across the horizon. The same collections should also help to nurture new audiences, both at home and… far from Moscow. The tracks on display - this time! - come from Russia, Ukraine, Belarus, and Estonia. All were published during October 2012. Within each file you'll find photographic, geographic, and archival information concerning the artist or band in question.
Various artists
FFM026
Opening track: Glintshake. "You could probably describe our songs as pointless. We sing in English." Why, precisely? "Well, people don't understand half the words, anyway. Our music has more to do with atmosphere than with any consequential train of thought." Both performance and coherent lyrics are equally devoid of purpose. * "Far from Moscow” is a project designed to aggregate songs and sounds (i.e., texts and tunes) over a very wide area. We also release regular compilations, dedicated to varied genres and digital material that might otherwise go unnoticed. These albums should help to slow the rate at which young and impressive performers move across the horizon. The same collections should also help to nurture new audiences, both at home and… far from Moscow. The tracks on display - this time! - come from Russia, Ukraine, Belarus, Lithuania, and Estonia. All were published during October 2012. Within each file you'll find photographic, geographic, and archival information concerning the artist or band in question.
Various artists
FFM025
Opening track. One of Russia's most impressive and discerning net-labels, Electronica, has just graced the airwaves with a new recording - and a new name. This morning in Moscow saw the publication of a five-track, twelve-minute EP from the young musician known professionally as IZ-O. A little time spent in the quieter corners of the Russian web will reveal that this individual is actually Ilya Zhomov, a long-time resident of Tver, which is approximately one hundred miles north of Moscow. He was helped in the production of this EP by a couple of key Electronica figures: the artwork was overseen by label founder Sasha Khizhnyakov and the sound itself was mastered by Tim Aminov. Mr. Zhomov has been quickly accepted into the fold. * "Far from Moscow” is a project designed to aggregate songs and sounds (i.e., texts and tunes) over a very wide area. We also release regular compilations, dedicated to varied genres and digital material that might otherwise go unnoticed. These albums should help to slow the rate at which young and impressive performers move across the horizon. The same collections should also help to nurture new audiences, both at home and… far from Moscow. The tracks on display - this time! - come from Russia, Ukraine, and Estonia. All were published during September 2012. Within each file you'll find photographic, geographic, and archival information concerning the artist or band in question.
Various artists
FFM024
Opening track. Moscow's Cao Sao Vang oversees the impressive Shufflebrain netlabel. In recent recordings he has spoken directly to the frustrating gap between disorienting, everyday experience and one's ability to manage it with speech. Can one, in short, designate and therefore control the messy nature of normality? Our musician, in a spirit of surrender, has previously been inclined to speak of schizophasia - the aimless, often pointlessly repetitious speech that marks mental illness. The most fitting reaction to daily life is absurdity. * "Far from Moscow” is a project designed to aggregate songs and sounds (i.e., texts and tunes) over a very wide area. We also release regular compilations, dedicated to varied genres and digital material that might otherwise go unnoticed. These albums should help to slow the rate at which young and impressive performers move across the horizon. The same collections should also help to nurture new audiences, both at home and… far from Moscow. The tracks on display - this time! - come from Russia, Ukraine, and Estonia. All were published during September 2012. Within each file you'll find photographic, geographic, and archival information concerning the artist or band in question.
Various artists
FFM023
Opening track: Maxim Savchenkov performs both as Honey and Honey Montana. Here a retreat from urban noise and crudity is seriously pondered. In order to weigh up the pros and cons of solitude, subjectivity, and lonely reverie, Savchenkov in the past has quoted directly from a medical text: "An individual might find himself constantly surrounded by people - and he many interact with them, too - yet he simultaneously feels isolated. He doesn't actually need these crowds. He feels neither love nor attraction towards them. This kind of loneliness is widespread among young people and, if it's not resolved in time, it can develop into adult forms..." * "Far from Moscow” is a project designed to aggregate and foster music over a very wide area. We have now decided - at the start of 2012 - to release regular compilations, dedicated to *varied* genres and digital material that might otherwise go unnoticed. These albums should help to slow the rate at which young and impressive performers move across the horizon. The same collections should also help to nurture new audiences, both at home and… far from Moscow. The tracks on display - this time! - come from Russia, Ukraine, Belarus, Estonia, Lithuania, and Latvia. All were published in the first weeks of 2012. Within each file you'll find photographic, geographic, and archival information concerning each artist or band.
Various artists
FFM022
Opening track: Gleb Raumskaya is a resident of St. Petersburg. We've followed his output for several years now, but his penchant for quietness continues. Currently he is a student at the city's State University of Technology and Design, which only increases the likelihood that academic studies will leave scant time for chatter. Nonetheless, whatever this musician's unwillingness to advertise his credo verbally, the results of his compositional work have left an impressive mark upon the public. * "Far from Moscow” is a project designed to aggregate and foster music over a very wide area. We have now decided - at the start of 2012 - to release regular compilations, dedicated to *varied* genres and digital material that might otherwise go unnoticed. These albums should help to slow the rate at which young and impressive performers move across the horizon. The same collections should also help to nurture new audiences, both at home and… far from Moscow. The tracks on display - this time! - come from Russia, Ukraine, Latvia, and Lithuania. All were published in the first weeks of 2012. Within each file you'll find photographic, geographic, and archival information concerning each artist or band.
Various artists
FFM021
Opening track: The six letters "mmpsuf," written in lower case, refer to a couple of Lithuanian musicians: Eglė Sirvydytė (voice, keyboards) and Aivaras Ruzgas (programming). Describing their output in typically abstract and romantic terms, they speak of "layered vocals, electronic off-beats, and steady rhythms... all of which, strangely enough, make sense [when interwoven]. The beauty behind the music comes from these songs' overarching imagery, [their imagined] spaces, and the stories that emerge. It's all so simple, yet so real, too." * "Far from Moscow” is a project designed to aggregate and foster music over a very wide area. We have now decided - at the start of 2012 - to release regular compilations, dedicated to *varied* genres and digital material that might otherwise go unnoticed. These albums should help to slow the rate at which young and impressive performers move across the horizon. The same collections should also help to nurture new audiences, both at home and… far from Moscow. The tracks on display - this time! - come from Russia, Ukraine, Belarus, Latvia, Lithuania, and Kazakhstan. All were published in the first weeks of 2012. Within each file you'll find photographic, geographic, and archival information concerning each artist or band.
Various artists
FFM020
Opening track: Qube Unite is a one-man operation from Kiev. This young producer - also nameless - has just published a romantic, retrospective LP: "Blur." The past is viewed in soft and fuzzy tones; it's encapsulated in a range of sentimental, jazzy hip-hop tracks recorded over the course of five days. "It's all free - so enjoy it and have fun! Thanks for all your support; check back for new, warm stuff [in the near future]." * "Far from Moscow” is a project designed to aggregate and foster music over a very wide area. We have now decided - at the start of 2012 - to release regular compilations, dedicated to *varied* genres and digital material that might otherwise go unnoticed. These albums should help to slow the rate at which young and impressive performers move across the horizon. The same collections should also help to nurture new audiences, both at home and… far from Moscow. The tracks on display - this time! - come from Russia, Ukraine, Belarus, and Kazakhstan. All were published in the first weeks of 2012. Within each file you'll find photographic, geographic, and archival information concerning each artist or band.
Various artists
FFM019
Opening track: Shampoo Voyagers (Khabarovsk and Moscow). These two artists work by swapping files across the web: "The project's main style is fundamentally downtempo - it's a[n audible] realm where lounge and nu-jazz meet glitch and experimental tendencies." These two - happily removed - individuals enjoy each other's absence(!) and thus spin easy-going tales of optimistic, free movement. * "Far from Moscow” is a project designed to aggregate and foster music over a very wide area. We have now decided - at the start of 2012 - to release regular compilations, dedicated to *varied* genres and digital material that might otherwise go unnoticed. These albums should help to slow the rate at which young and impressive performers move across the horizon. The same collections should also help to nurture new audiences, both at home and… far from Moscow. The tracks on display - this time! - come from Russia, Ukraine, Belarus, and Latvia. All were published in the first weeks of 2012. Within each file you'll find photographic, geographic, and archival information concerning each artist or band.
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