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Keeping Silence at Bay: The "II Miracle" Compilation from Ezhevika
The Ezhevika label in Minsk, Belarus has published a new compilation of regional music. The contributors consider their bonds both to colleagues and predecessors.
The Sounds of a Meaningless Heritage: Rock's Seasonal Roundup
As FFM reconsiders some of the Russian and Belarusian rock recordings of winter 2016, a common theme emerges of self-deprecation. Albeit with strange benefits.
Just One Letter: Kobra, Awlnight, Sasha Vinogradova, Mariqa & Armanjazz
A series of new publications from St. Petersburg, Moscow, and provincial Belarus all give thought to the slimmest of differences between matters "cosmic and comic."
A Shared Silence: Petlia Pristrastiia, Say My Name, Volchok & Weary Eyes
The traditions of Slavic rock are––even today––likely to be associated with wordy, political agendas. Four new recordings, however, pay more attention to silence.
Seven Kinds of Solitude: The Best of New Belarusian Songwriting
The Belarusian magazine Experty.By has compiled a series of Top Ten lists, cataloging the best bands and recordings of last year.
Deconstruction: Harmash, Mujuice, 4 Positions of Bruno & Gultskra Artikler
Against the backdrop of East European political and economic challenges, four recordings ponder the appeal of deconstructive gestures––rather than stately pomp.
Endless April: Oleg Kostrow, Secret Avenue, Inna Pivars, & Respublika Palina
In four new recordings from Russia and Belarus, thoughts of the future predominate. As tomorrow looks unpredictable, childhood and adolescence gain a special importance.
Amid a Crowd of Stars: The "I MIRACLE" Album from Ezhevika (Minsk)
The Belarusian label Ezhevika has just published a compilation album, "I MIRACLE." It gathers nineteen recordings from towns both near and far; together the tracks create a workplace philosophy.
A Language of Hope: Life on Marx, Artek Elektronika, AMVI, and Acid Reich
As a British newspaper suggests that nostalgia in Russian popular music is inherently political, an alternative viewpoint arises. Many young artists fondly recall a time, rather than an ideology.
Natural Patterns: Letkolben, lwpss, Giriu Dvasios, and Andrey Kiritchenko
New electronic recordings from Belarus, Russia, and Ukraine - via Berlin - question the liberties of commercial and noncommercial enterprise. The same questions are framed ecologically.
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