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Unvoiced Dreams: Sirotkin, Artek Elektronika, The Tairyfale, Kim & Buran
As a series of new recordings take inspiration from the melancholy romance of Soviet pop music, the question arises: what about tomorrow?
From Yekaterinburg and Beyond: Sansara, RSAC, OQJAV, and AloeVera
The city of Yekaterinburg has a proud connection to the rock and protest songs of perestroika. Do any local bands from that city share the same convictions today?
Seven Kinds of Solitude: The Best of New Belarusian Songwriting
The Belarusian magazine Experty.By has compiled a series of Top Ten lists, cataloging the best bands and recordings of last year.
Sobering Answers: On-the-Go, Lemonday, Sonic Death, and Palms on Fire
Four rock bands consider their professional success––and the sacrifice it demands. Various alternatives are pondered to linear notions of progress.
Outside: Pinkshinyultrablast, Oat Oaks, Alla Dmitrievna, and Australian Kiss
As various bands perform in distant places, travel the globe, or simply dream, a common desire emerges: the possibility of erasing geography altogether.
Optimism: Murakami, Pryamo v Guby, Vnutrennee Sgoranie, & Phooey!
In these challenging economic times for musicians across Eastern Europe, the role played by optimism is vital. We look at four new recordings––and varying degrees of hope.
Distant Stars: K.A.T.Y.A., Cricket Captains, Shuma, and Misha Mishenko
As a number of Russian, Belarusian, and Ukrainian artists consider their future plans, it transpires that the most hopeful songs grow from the greatest failures. Frustrations breed aspirations.
Amity: Wednesday Morning, Young Adults, Kate in the Box & Platya za 130
Two all-female Russian outfits sing of human relations with bittersweet humor. Placed together with other releases this week, their knowing smiles become an overarching social skepticism.
The Light Inside: Sus Dungo, Moa Pillar, Malish Kamu, and 4 Pozicii Bruno
One primary impulse in contemporary East European music is the desire for soundscapes to counter actuality. Four new recordings look askance at whatever is going on outside the front door.
A Language of Hope: Life on Marx, Artek Elektronika, AMVI, and Acid Reich
As a British newspaper suggests that nostalgia in Russian popular music is inherently political, an alternative viewpoint arises. Many young artists fondly recall a time, rather than an ideology.
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