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Black Metal Realism: Starpowers, Saint God, Neulovimye Mstiteli & Otstoy
Having grown up with the deeply negative traditions of black metal, these bands realize that a nihilist rejection of everything can have positive results.
Nowhere to Play: Glintshake, WLVS, Mooncake, & Show Me a Dinosaur
As socioeconomic realia impinge more and more upon private experience, the call for both difference and dignified dreaming sounds louder.
Shouts across the Void: Shop Assistants, JUUR, Stoned Jesus & Saint God
New garage, stoner, and doom rock recordings express a growing tension between dreams and actuality. The responses range from desperation to indifference.
Lessons of the Past: Trud, Jaunt, Kirov, and Bicycles for Afghanistan
Several new rock recordings, all the way from Saint Petersburg to Simferopol, express doubts about grand spectacle. Better, smaller forms of interaction are found both in memories and on stage.
Loud Tunes for Dancing Bears: Serdceder, Otstoy, Mraz, and Smola
In the wake of a garage and punk festival in Moscow, the question has arisen of protest songs. Is that style, volume level, and its violence synonymous with hopes of civic change? The answer is surprising.
Post-Perfectionists: Vhore, I Silovye Mashiny, Suvital, and Starcardigan
Various forms of escapism are encountered in modern Russian music, all the way from storied space rock to garage hedonism and masochistic decadence. Examples of them all transpire this week.
From Ambitions to Anxiety: Red Deer, Starpowers, Phooey!, and Materic
Rock recordings from St. Petersburg and beyond fall to a growing sense of fatalism. Destiny seems to accompany the gradual, grim transition from hope into hopelessness.
Difficult Songs: Grand Astoria, Best Pessimist, Brave Men Run, and Pony
As the socioeconomic and political situations grow more challenging in Russia and Ukraine, new rock recordings turn away from civic actuality - towards introspection and psychedelia.
New Names and Pain: Ploho, Srub, Zvezdi, Vhore, and Super Besse
In June a music event called "Pain Fest" will celebrate rock music from Serbia, Belarus, and - most importantly - Siberia. The bands from that part of Russia cultivate a link to the punk traditions of their home.
Show Me a Dinosaur, Lucidvox, Karovas Milkshake, and Reserve de Marche
Four Russian rock publications play upon aspects of a psychedelic heritage. They either draw directly from Western traditions or extend the meaning of psychedelia from its roots in the Soviet '70s.
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