Soft Rock

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Volchok: "Villages" and a Chekhovian Sadness
Volchok (tr: Wolf Cub) began - and endure - as a duo: Larisa Timerkaeva and Ilya Udovenko. Originally from the industrial, provincial city of Izhevsk, they both now operate from Moscow.
Fleeting Likelihoods: The New Subwise and Belka Compilations (2017)
Two important compilations of late have very diverse origins: indie tape music and downtempo idm or glitch. They are both, however, fueled by a lasting desire to be somewhere else
Whatever Comes Out: Kruzhok, Kusto, Siberian Tsars, and Pia Fraus
Grounded in 1990s' shoegaze, new recording rock from Moscow, Saint Petersburg, and Tallinn have difficulty any finding similar inspiration in 2017. An argument ensues.
A Broader Expanse: Aya with Us, Ne Tvoe Delo, ÁGNI & Pomni Imya Svoe
Various recordings this week explore the traditional nature of lyricism in Russian songwriting. History has never made self-realization an easy issue.
Monologs and a Stereo Sound: Vanyn, Ethica, Bananafish & Jonny Online
The recordings under consideration all speak in favor of humility and various forms of dialog. Current actuality, however, tends to prefer a strident monolog.
Getting There: Lena Kudrina, Kawri's Whisper, Endless Melancholy & Isea N
The theme of time is foregrounded by several new publications, but their authors remain unsure of an ideal outlook: forwards to the future––or back to a superior past?
Improvisation: Artemiev, A. Toymintseva, M. Kutskova, and A. Rostotskaya
Four recent publications from solo artists in both Russian jazz and pop music are dedicated to themes of individual effort––and the related risks thereof.
A Shared Silence: Petlia Pristrastiia, Say My Name, Volchok & Weary Eyes
The traditions of Slavic rock are––even today––likely to be associated with wordy, political agendas. Four new recordings, however, pay more attention to silence.
Unvoiced Dreams: Sirotkin, Artek Elektronika, The Tairyfale, Kim & Buran
As a series of new recordings take inspiration from the melancholy romance of Soviet pop music, the question arises: what about tomorrow?
From Yekaterinburg and Beyond: Sansara, RSAC, OQJAV, and AloeVera
The city of Yekaterinburg has a proud connection to the rock and protest songs of perestroika. Do any local bands from that city share the same convictions today?
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