Rock

Filter by genres:
Dance | Electronic | Jazz | Pop | Reggae | Rock | All genres
Regions:
Russia | Ukraine | Belarus | All regions
Vmgnovenijah: "Smoke" and a Stubborn Independence
Vmgnovenijah are a trio: Sasha Stroganov (guitar/vocals), Svyatoslav Vershinin (drums/percussion), and Pavel Klushnik (bass). Their ornate, almost unpronounceable stage-name is actually a deliberately odd combination of two words in Russian, which - when placed equally close in English - might read "Inmoments."
Volchok: "Villages" and a Chekhovian Sadness
Volchok (tr: Wolf Cub) began - and endure - as a duo: Larisa Timerkaeva and Ilya Udovenko. Originally from the industrial, provincial city of Izhevsk, they both now operate from Moscow.
Whatever Comes Out: Kruzhok, Kusto, Siberian Tsars, and Pia Fraus
Grounded in 1990s' shoegaze, new recording rock from Moscow, Saint Petersburg, and Tallinn have difficulty any finding similar inspiration in 2017. An argument ensues.
The Sounds of a Meaningless Heritage: Rock's Seasonal Roundup
As FFM reconsiders some of the Russian and Belarusian rock recordings of winter 2016, a common theme emerges of self-deprecation. Albeit with strange benefits.
Distant Storms: Holy Palms, Boris Grim, Pia Fraus & Show Me a Dinosaur
Either through the traditions of shoegaze or the older conventions of nocturnal and stellar imagery, four recordings look back towards a purportedly "Eurasian" form of solitude.
Sonic Garbage: Won James Won, AWOTT, Zhenya Kukoverov & IHNABTB
Our interlocking and semi-improvised recordings from Moscow's underground rock scene still give voice––in 2016––to some very old dilemmas indeed.
Black Metal Realism: Starpowers, Saint God, Neulovimye Mstiteli & Otstoy
Having grown up with the deeply negative traditions of black metal, these bands realize that a nihilist rejection of everything can have positive results.
Monologs and a Stereo Sound: Vanyn, Ethica, Bananafish & Jonny Online
The recordings under consideration all speak in favor of humility and various forms of dialog. Current actuality, however, tends to prefer a strident monolog.
Nowhere to Play: Glintshake, WLVS, Mooncake, & Show Me a Dinosaur
As socioeconomic realia impinge more and more upon private experience, the call for both difference and dignified dreaming sounds louder.
A Shared Silence: Petlia Pristrastiia, Say My Name, Volchok & Weary Eyes
The traditions of Slavic rock are––even today––likely to be associated with wordy, political agendas. Four new recordings, however, pay more attention to silence.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | >

Related Artists