Power pop

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Improvisation: Artemiev, A. Toymintseva, M. Kutskova, and A. Rostotskaya
Four recent publications from solo artists in both Russian jazz and pop music are dedicated to themes of individual effort––and the related risks thereof.
A Shared Silence: Petlia Pristrastiia, Say My Name, Volchok & Weary Eyes
The traditions of Slavic rock are––even today––likely to be associated with wordy, political agendas. Four new recordings, however, pay more attention to silence.
Seven Kinds of Solitude: The Best of New Belarusian Songwriting
The Belarusian magazine Experty.By has compiled a series of Top Ten lists, cataloging the best bands and recordings of last year.
From Abstract to Anarchist: Ninja Glam and Clonki (FFM52 and 53)
The two newest FFM releases have direct connections to the Russian capital. One has slowly moved towards Moscow; the other hopes somehow to escape.
Sobering Answers: On-the-Go, Lemonday, Sonic Death, and Palms on Fire
Four rock bands consider their professional success––and the sacrifice it demands. Various alternatives are pondered to linear notions of progress.
Outside: Pinkshinyultrablast, Oat Oaks, Alla Dmitrievna, and Australian Kiss
As various bands perform in distant places, travel the globe, or simply dream, a common desire emerges: the possibility of erasing geography altogether.
Shouts across the Void: Shop Assistants, JUUR, Stoned Jesus & Saint God
New garage, stoner, and doom rock recordings express a growing tension between dreams and actuality. The responses range from desperation to indifference.
Optimism: Murakami, Pryamo v Guby, Vnutrennee Sgoranie, & Phooey!
In these challenging economic times for musicians across Eastern Europe, the role played by optimism is vital. We look at four new recordings––and varying degrees of hope.
Distant Suns: Pianoboy, Internet Sushi, Thy Lankasters & Crimson Butterfly
Three new recordings make direct reference to Japanese history and habits. A distant nation fuels dreams of some alternative to local reality. The more actuality disappoints, the further desire travels from home.
We Hid in Dark Places: OBGON, Cassiopeia, Miyuki, and Gidropony
Across the varied contexts of cyberpunk narratives, trash TV, driving Moscow techno, and religious satire runs a common theme. The value of humility.
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