Post-Hardcore

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Nowhere in Particular: Biblioteka, EIMIC, February, and Blackpaperplanes
Through their use of other languages, employment overseas, and various forms of Wanderlust, these four bands work hard to ignore domestic culture. Anywhere - and anything - looks better than home.
Fate: Mutaforiya Lili, Synecdoche Montauk, Fanny Kaplan, and Weary Eyes
Four new releases by baroque- and/or chamber pop outfits ponder a common theme of self-determination. To what degree do these youngsters feel any control over their increasingly social lives?
Considerable Noise from Tomsk, Siberia: Jack Wood (FFM32)
This Siberian trio comes from the city of Tomsk. The local scene is not promising, yet that brings a strange advantage. In a place where there's nothing to gain, there's also nothing to lose.
Ned Hoper (Saint Petersburg, FFM9): The Self Detection EP
Who exactly is Ned Hoper? There's no such person in real life, even though the band members keep insisting upon the Australian roots of their legendary frontman. Their explanation is full of imagination and far from fact.
Four Vistas: Plane Passenger, More & Rel'sy, Motorama, and The Toads
A couple of rock bands far from Moscow ponder the benefits of avoiding its cutthroat industry. No matter how that might sound like consolation for a failed career, other ensembles tend to agree.
Yielding: Glintshake, Okudjav, Commercial Marines, and Universe Inside
In a range of new recordings from Moscow, Yekaterinburg, and Chelyabinsk, aimlessness comes to the fore. These young musicians have scant faith in social progress: "uselessness" becomes their goal.
Love Songs and Likelihood: Auroraw, New Maps, Shadazz, and Phooey!
Hoping to develop their careers in a meaningful fashion, these bands consider writing uplifting or consoling love songs. Reality, however, unfolds in strange ways and fosters a less optimistic outlook.
Outwards: Elf & Puppet House, Argo Vals, Lucidvox, and A. Maskeliade
As magazines and festivals seek to promote young musicians, they speak of great promise and flourishing local scenes. The performers themselves are less sure.
Deliverance: Polska Radio One, Snakecharm, Elecman, and Analog Sound
As musicians from Murmansk and Moscow online encounter rudeness, disdain, or indifference, an alternative is needed to actuality. A reconsideration of '70s psychedelia does the job very nicely.
Fortitude: Alabama Joe, The Toads, Galman Project, and Roundaround
A handful of new rock recordings include overlapping issues of isolation, impending poverty, and grim destiny. Considerable effort is needed in order to erase those feelings of diminished agency.
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