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Fleeting Likelihoods: The New Subwise and Belka Compilations (2017)
Two important compilations of late have very diverse origins: indie tape music and downtempo idm or glitch. They are both, however, fueled by a lasting desire to be somewhere else
Whatever Comes Out: Kruzhok, Kusto, Siberian Tsars, and Pia Fraus
Grounded in 1990s' shoegaze, new recording rock from Moscow, Saint Petersburg, and Tallinn have difficulty any finding similar inspiration in 2017. An argument ensues.
Quixotic Contradictions: Vihrea, Alex Kelman, Siba.Pro, and Antrru
Four new recordings from Siberia, Karelia and Saint Petersburg try to contradict actuality with unique daydreams and fantasies. Not all of them work.
Discreet Stanzas: Anton Malinen, Grebenshchik, Gaya Marina & "Bo i Bro"
Four new acoustic releases have roots in very diverse towns, all the way from Magadan to Kharkiv. What they share is a desire to hide from crude actuality.
A Broader Expanse: Aya with Us, Ne Tvoe Delo, ÁGNI & Pomni Imya Svoe
Various recordings this week explore the traditional nature of lyricism in Russian songwriting. History has never made self-realization an easy issue.
High-Frequency Pressures: Cream Soda, Mamanet, Naadya, and Filatique
Using either canonical or peripheral dance-floor sounds, four publications from Russia and Ukraine consider the growing "pressure" of stately intent upon private whim.
Improvisation: Artemiev, A. Toymintseva, M. Kutskova, and A. Rostotskaya
Four recent publications from solo artists in both Russian jazz and pop music are dedicated to themes of individual effort––and the related risks thereof.
Unvoiced Dreams: Sirotkin, Artek Elektronika, The Tairyfale, Kim & Buran
As a series of new recordings take inspiration from the melancholy romance of Soviet pop music, the question arises: what about tomorrow?
Road Movies: VEiiLA, Romantiki, Vivienne Mort, and So Mnoyu Vot Chto
The future can be unpredictable in Eastern Europe. Four new recordings visualize tomorrow as a road movie, a winding or rocky passage, and a dead end. Hope is needed.
From a Parallel Universe: Onuka, Zulya, Capo Blanco, and Liza Khegai
Amid four Russian and Ukrainian projects there emerges a telling view of lyricism in modern pop music. A three-minute, micro social narrative is more satisfying than society itself.
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