Filter by genres:
Dance | Electronic | Jazz | Pop | Reggae | Rock | All genres
Russia | Ukraine | Belarus | All regions
Discreet Stanzas: Anton Malinen, Grebenshchik, Gaya Marina & "Bo i Bro"
Four new acoustic releases have roots in very diverse towns, all the way from Magadan to Kharkiv. What they share is a desire to hide from crude actuality.
A Broader Expanse: Aya with Us, Ne Tvoe Delo, ÁGNI & Pomni Imya Svoe
Various recordings this week explore the traditional nature of lyricism in Russian songwriting. History has never made self-realization an easy issue.
Quiet Introspection versus Outer Space: Noraus, Feizah, AIST, and Gxitt
New instrumental or hypnagogic recordings from Naberezhnye Chelny, Ulan-Ude, Moscow, and Dnipropetrovsk are all dedicated to silence. Dreamers need peace and quiet.
High-Frequency Pressures: Cream Soda, Mamanet, Naadya, and Filatique
Using either canonical or peripheral dance-floor sounds, four publications from Russia and Ukraine consider the growing "pressure" of stately intent upon private whim.
Improvisation: Artemiev, A. Toymintseva, M. Kutskova, and A. Rostotskaya
Four recent publications from solo artists in both Russian jazz and pop music are dedicated to themes of individual effort––and the related risks thereof.
Unvoiced Dreams: Sirotkin, Artek Elektronika, The Tairyfale, Kim & Buran
As a series of new recordings take inspiration from the melancholy romance of Soviet pop music, the question arises: what about tomorrow?
Road Movies: VEiiLA, Romantiki, Vivienne Mort, and So Mnoyu Vot Chto
The future can be unpredictable in Eastern Europe. Four new recordings visualize tomorrow as a road movie, a winding or rocky passage, and a dead end. Hope is needed.
From Abstract to Anarchist: Ninja Glam and Clonki (FFM52 and 53)
The two newest FFM releases have direct connections to the Russian capital. One has slowly moved towards Moscow; the other hopes somehow to escape.
From a Parallel Universe: Onuka, Zulya, Capo Blanco, and Liza Khegai
Amid four Russian and Ukrainian projects there emerges a telling view of lyricism in modern pop music. A three-minute, micro social narrative is more satisfying than society itself.
The World Outside: Sunrises, Japanese Ash, Nearfield, and Atariame
From snowy Siberia to the medieval towns of Belarus, a range of new recordings are directly informed by their melancholy setting. A folk ensemble from Saint Petersburg pushes back––with a smile.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | >

Related Artists