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Vmgnovenijah: "Smoke" and a Stubborn Independence
Vmgnovenijah are a trio: Sasha Stroganov (guitar/vocals), Svyatoslav Vershinin (drums/percussion), and Pavel Klushnik (bass). Their ornate, almost unpronounceable stage-name is actually a deliberately odd combination of two words in Russian, which - when placed equally close in English - might read "Inmoments."
Nowhere to Play: Glintshake, WLVS, Mooncake, & Show Me a Dinosaur
As socioeconomic realia impinge more and more upon private experience, the call for both difference and dignified dreaming sounds louder.
Loud Tunes for Dancing Bears: Serdceder, Otstoy, Mraz, and Smola
In the wake of a garage and punk festival in Moscow, the question has arisen of protest songs. Is that style, volume level, and its violence synonymous with hopes of civic change? The answer is surprising.
Transgression: WLVS, Bears Garden, Looch, and All Tomorrow's Parties
Four bands from Tashkent, Vladivostok, St. Petersburg, and Samara ponder the meaning of subversion. What defines a "rebellious" spirit and should it be directed against social failings?
Gallows Humor: Ilosthebalcony, Fanny Kaplan, Kul'tura Kureniia, and TBFW
Four young bands embody a spirit of protest, yet they're unnerved by the feeling that rebellion rarely changes anything. That combination of outrage and anxiety leads to a healthy self-irony.
Battling Emptiness: Detieti, For You Earth, Tlushch, and Kshettra
From the outskirts of two capitals - Moscow and Minsk - come some songs designed to inspire. They discern a certain civic or ideological "emptiness" and hope to offer a consoling alternative.
Trance-Like Effort: uSSSy, Euglena, The Tolstoys, and Nikola Tesla
Four Russian bands champion their chosen styles, from "garage revival" to "quarter-tone rock," based upon Middle Eastern traditions. Across them all, diligence hopes to drown out reality.
Despair: Shop Assistants, 2MORROW2LATE, Forbirds, and Insane Prototype
Four lo-fi and garage recordings consider their relationship to rebellion. Is the deafening racket of a garage tradition suggestive of freedom - or an inability to escape actuality?
Doubting Exclamations: Alabama Joe, Aorta, Say!More! and Phooey!
Four rock bands from Ukrainian and Russian towns present new material that embodies a marked tension between subversion and acquiescence. Discontent and acceptance find voice simultaneously.
Away from the Barricades: Ongkara, Petlia Pristrastiia, Jane Air, and Louna
Despite a rich tradition of social protest in Russian rock music, some recent recordings have found such entrenched lacunae within local life that other themes transpire. Escapism replaces subversion.
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