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An Expansive World: Pixelord, Neon Lights, Doyeq, and RezQ Sound
The physical destruction in Donetsk is only one form of material failure encountered by Slavic musicians today. Together they head for digital realms instead.
The Pull of the Past: KSKY, 130 Vespa, Komba Bakkh, and BMB Spacekid
A couple of northern projects look with fondness at Soviet culture, given the failings of the present day. More powerful than childhood retrospection, however, is the invocation of an ancient tradition.
A Fleeting Present: Aortha & Goron, Shortparis, and L.I.M.B. (FFM48-50)
Various inevitabilities gather strength around three releases from Moscow, St. Petersburg, and Minsk. In the face of diminishing liberties, a certain presentism emerges, celebrating the here and now.
Self-Reliance and Reflection: Elaflume, HKG Knights, (((О))), and Cortel
Four new publications, stretching from provincial Belarus to Vladivostok, look askance at social existence. The more crudity and/or banality it manifests, the more self-reliance comes to the fore.
Minor Interactions: Raumskaya, Control Light, and Festival Lounge
As the socioeconomic situation worsens in Russia, so do attitudes towards society. Civic activity promises less and less. Consequently, several artists speak in support of minimal interaction.
An Enlightening Escape: Casey Cat, Tantsui, Jimmy Roqsta, and Moresebya
New dancefloor offerings from Russia and Estonia struggle with viable forms of optimism. "Escapism" becomes less a matter of hedonism and more a conscious response to unsatisfying actuality.
Ideals from Nowhere: Suokas, Tram Drivers, Tsunadem, and Wick Blaze
The importance of silence and solitude appears in four new publications. They emerge across considerable distances, all the way from some lightless forests in Karelia to the quieter, cobbled streets of Ukraine.
Abstract Worlds: Ewan Limb, Filatique, Moonscape, and Phil Anker
One might think that a challenging social environment would lessen the appeal of romantic wistfulness among young artists. A hard life might breed resignation or greater pragmatism. Nothing of the sort.
Kings of Empty Dancefloors: Korablove, Swaves, Luka, and Cao Sao Vang
Various professional and social difficulties lead four electronic musicians from Russia and Belarus to celebrate solitude, peace, and quiet. A distance from social life appears to produce superior sounds.
Lyricism under Pressure: Naadya, Onuka, The Cancel, and KSKY
Four new publications from Russian and Ukrainian artists juxtapose the desire to sing or perform with a likely public response. In an unforgiving social context, dare one express private views?
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