Elevator music

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Almost Nowhere to Be Seen: SBPCh (СБП4), Ferrein, Tiiiza, and Pixelord
"The theme of an .exe file loops backs to my very own childhood: to the sounds of idm music, to DOS programs, and an overall sense of 'cyber-romance'" (Pixelord, Aleksey Devyanin)
Two Kinds of Anonymity: Paul Menska, x.y.r., IC3PEAK, and Milky Toad
Russian social networks are home both to shyness and subversion. Some artists seek nameless refuge, while others plan loud protest––from nowhere.
Discreet Stanzas: Anton Malinen, Grebenshchik, Gaya Marina & "Bo i Bro"
Four new acoustic releases have roots in very diverse towns, all the way from Magadan to Kharkiv. What they share is a desire to hide from crude actuality.
Just One Letter: Kobra, Awlnight, Sasha Vinogradova, Mariqa & Armanjazz
A series of new publications from St. Petersburg, Moscow, and provincial Belarus all give thought to the slimmest of differences between matters "cosmic and comic."
Improvisation: Artemiev, A. Toymintseva, M. Kutskova, and A. Rostotskaya
Four recent publications from solo artists in both Russian jazz and pop music are dedicated to themes of individual effort––and the related risks thereof.
Unvoiced Dreams: Sirotkin, Artek Elektronika, The Tairyfale, Kim & Buran
As a series of new recordings take inspiration from the melancholy romance of Soviet pop music, the question arises: what about tomorrow?
Some of the Smallest Waves: The "Terminal Dream" Compilation, 2016
A new label in Moscow––Terminal Dream––is dedicated to local ambient artists. Brought together, they reveal some common ideas about sound, space, and purpose.
Distant Stars: K.A.T.Y.A., Cricket Captains, Shuma, and Misha Mishenko
As a number of Russian, Belarusian, and Ukrainian artists consider their future plans, it transpires that the most hopeful songs grow from the greatest failures. Frustrations breed aspirations.
Moderation and Reticence: Siba.Pro, i Delfiny, Honey, and Capo Blanco
For reasons both social and philosophical, four Russian projects release new recordings with zero promotion. The logic of material wellbeing is sidelined in favor of a quieter worldview, hinted at in quotations.
Simplicity: Ewert and the Two Dragons, Vihrea, Pur:Pur, and Evgeny Grinko
Against the backdrop of recent geopolitical events, one might understand why minorism would have a marked appeal. Four collectives from Russia, Ukraine, and Estonia place smallness front and center.
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