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Virtual Trajectories: Oxxxymiron, The Erised, ABC Galaxy, and Vakula
Criticism of professional options in Russia and Ukraine is countered with a series of alternatives: psychedelia, fantasy, emigration––and virtual reality.
Convergence: Two New Compilation LPs from Electronica & Full of Nothing
Two of Russia's most significant independent labels––Electronica and Full of Nothing––have begun the New Year with simultaneous compilation albums.
Major Projects in a Minor Setting: Bop, Nuage, Dissident/Kontext & KSKY
An interwoven network of musicians in Saint Petersburg unveils a series of publications––almost simultaneously. Perhaps unsurprisingly, they all share common ideas and convictions.
We Hid in Dark Places: OBGON, Cassiopeia, Miyuki, and Gidropony
Across the varied contexts of cyberpunk narratives, trash TV, driving Moscow techno, and religious satire runs a common theme. The value of humility.
Distant Stars: K.A.T.Y.A., Cricket Captains, Shuma, and Misha Mishenko
As a number of Russian, Belarusian, and Ukrainian artists consider their future plans, it transpires that the most hopeful songs grow from the greatest failures. Frustrations breed aspirations.
Twenty-One Outsiders: The "Cyberghetto" Compilation from Hyperboloid
Moscow's Hyperboloid label releases a new compilation, dedicated to the noisy residents of Russia's "cyberghetto." That neologism has several meanings, both local and international.
Wind, Sand, and Stars: Yuka, Foresteppe, x.y.r., and Race to Space
One of the most enduring motifs of Soviet culture within Russian popular music has been the so-called "Space Race"––the competition between Moscow and Washington to explore the cosmos.
A Tribute to the Past: Maxim Buldakov, Ilya Gerus, Inlensk, and Sugar God
All the way from Moscow to the villages of Siberia, a common idea finds voice in a handful of dance floor publications. In four of these releases, the romance of nostalgia and happy stasis proves most persistent.
Flying Far from Home: 813, Ewan Limb, Dave Pad, and Tram Drivers
As new recordings appear for dance floors across Russia and Ukraine, one would expect hedonism and jollity to predominate. The challenges of a touring musician quickly change the mood.
Contra: Vėjopatis, Autoisolation, Remember Your Name & Uncapitals Tour
Marxist rhetoric, when addressing social change, likes to codify the passage of quantitative civic changes as qualitative. Four new recordings from Russia and Lithuania adopt the same spirit.
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