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Just One Letter: Kobra, Awlnight, Sasha Vinogradova, Mariqa & Armanjazz
A series of new publications from St. Petersburg, Moscow, and provincial Belarus all give thought to the slimmest of differences between matters "cosmic and comic."
Improvisation: Artemiev, A. Toymintseva, M. Kutskova, and A. Rostotskaya
Four recent publications from solo artists in both Russian jazz and pop music are dedicated to themes of individual effort––and the related risks thereof.
Distant Stars: K.A.T.Y.A., Cricket Captains, Shuma, and Misha Mishenko
As a number of Russian, Belarusian, and Ukrainian artists consider their future plans, it transpires that the most hopeful songs grow from the greatest failures. Frustrations breed aspirations.
Tales of Independence: Gorbach, Niklavz, Despotin Fam, and Beatcase
From Latvia, Lithuania, and Russia, four new releases appear, all inspired by a hip-hop tradition. They also voice a connection to other musical events of prior decades - together with their social impact.
Tales of Solitude: Inna Zhelannaia, Naadya, Evgeny Grinko, and Megapolis
Four new releases from Moscow artists look askance at the massed workings of modernity. As a result, songs of retrospection, solitude, and even isolation have an increasing appeal.
Happy55: "A Magic Word" (Voronezh, FFM25)
Happy55 are a jazz trio from the southern industrial city of Voronezh. Against that backdrop, and the weight of ailing history, these gifted performers find much value in improvisation and spontaneity.
Four Understatements: Misha Mishenko, Maguett, Speck, and Sö
Humility and understatement color a number of Russian instrumental releases. Their audible modesty is prompted by childhood memories, an eco-aesthetic, and disorienting experiences online.
Destiny: Anise, Nikadimus Experience, Crossworlds, and Gamayun's Cubs
Moscow's Anise Project is fronted by Anna Volkova. She speaks of how adult experience tempers youthful fantasy. Some causes of that local fatalism are sought by other collectives in folklore.
Three Odysseys: Live People, O. Bogussevich, R. Stolyar and V. Luchansky
Moscow's Fancy Music is announcing a range of new jazz recordings. Originating both in the capital and Novosibirsk, they give voice to a passionate defense of deviation, difference, and inclusion.
Youthful Potentials: Brinstaar, Kai Engel, Curly Brown, and Lingvisto
Four recordings from three Russian cities show increasing concern about the promise of adulthood. Greater hope emerges from literature, retrospection, and even thoughts of "prenatal" oceanic life.
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