Articles

Audio

King Imagine – Buffer Zone (w Illoncablo)
Sonornote – Waltz of Flowers (w Sobrio and Unlogic Thing)
Tobetozero / 2b20 – Break Dance Low (w Rushmo)
Sobrio – Gravity (w Quanthe)
Neonicle – Part Two (w Rushmo)

Latest Artists

TOP-10

1
Narva, Estonia
2
Saint Petersburg, Russian Fed.
3
Kemerovo, Russian Federation
4
Saint Petersburg, Russian Fed.
5
Yekaterinburg, Russian Federation
6
Krasnoyarsk, Russian Federation
7
Tolyatti, Russian Federation
8
Moscow, Russian Federation
9
Smolensk, Russian Federation
10
Yekaterinburg, Russian Federation

Genres

Dance

Some Russian recordings this week refer to their distance from the capital, directly or otherwise. Rather than fall victim to any stereotypes of provinciality, they instead see a benefit in remoteness.

Electronic

New electronic recordings from a range of outlying Russian cities draw parallels between their location and local history. A sense of distance transpires, both from cultural centers and the passage of time.

Pop

As material constraints frustrate a number of young Russian musicians, thoughts turn to various kinds of ascent. Poems are dedicated to movement above the rooftops - and even into the stars.

Rock

A couple of rock bands far from Moscow ponder the benefits of avoiding its cutthroat industry. No matter how that might sound like consolation for a failed career, other ensembles tend to agree.
Various artists
FFM037
Opening track: "The figure of Miyuki can be tricky to describe for a number of reasons. Not only do we have a Japanese moniker that's clearly designed to hide any mundane identity. A second layer of complexity then emerges from gendered assumptions about Russian electronica. In a performative realm where men outnumber women by an enormous margin, it becomes difficult to say whether a second, female, and evidently non-Slavic name is real. In other words, one of the Miyuki accounts is linked to the networking profile of a certain "Lera Bauer" in Novosibirsk...." "Far from Moscow” is a project designed to aggregate songs and sounds (i.e., texts and tunes) over a very wide area. We also release regular compilations, dedicated to varied genres and digital material that might otherwise go unnoticed. These albums should help to slow the rate at which young and impressive performers move across the horizon. The same collections should also help to nurture new audiences, both at home and… far from Moscow. The tracks on display - this time! - come from Russia and Ukraine. All were published during May and June 2013. Within each file you'll find photographic, geographic, and archival information concerning the artist or band in question
Various artists
FFM036
Opening track: Anna Pingina. "Songs are born at the intersection of times, cultures, and ethnicities... The most interesting aspect of their development happens when somebody hears a traditional song - and then sings it in their own, special way. In doing so, they extend the song's life whilst giving it a unique melody or signature. Songs flow from region to region - and from people to people, too. It's never possible to say where they began." * "Far from Moscow” is a project designed to aggregate songs and sounds (i.e., texts and tunes) over a very wide area. We also release regular compilations, dedicated to varied genres and digital material that might otherwise go unnoticed. These albums should help to slow the rate at which young and impressive performers move across the horizon. The same collections should also help to nurture new audiences, both at home and… far from Moscow. The tracks on display - this time! - come from Russia, Ukraine, Lithuania, and Uzbekistan. All were published during May and June 2013. Within each file you'll find photographic, geographic, and archival information concerning the artist or band in question
Various artists
FFM035
Opening track: "Xuman undoubtedly draw upon the synth-pop of the 1980s. It seems reasonable to suggest that the generally uplifting, optimistic outlook of that movement in the West forms a stark counterpart to the grim Russian experiences of the same decade. From a Slavic standpoint, therefore, it's a pleasing way to reconsider and redo one's youth. A 1980s' aesthetic redux." * "Far from Moscow” is a project designed to aggregate songs and sounds (i.e., texts and tunes) over a very wide area. We also release regular compilations, dedicated to varied genres and digital material that might otherwise go unnoticed. These albums should help to slow the rate at which young and impressive performers move across the horizon. The same collections should also help to nurture new audiences, both at home and… far from Moscow. The tracks on display - this time! - come from Russia, Ukraine, and Belarus. All were published during Spring 2013. Within each file you'll find photographic, geographic, and archival information concerning the artist or band in question
Various artists
FFM034
Opening track: Malefique. "This music requires a slightly different level of awareness than you'd expect to see in 70% of the music in today's market. These are tracks designed for thought, laughter.. and melancholy, too. Each of them contains a little story, together with some feelings. They may not be the kind of stories that everyone has encountered [in their private lives]- but they could well find a little resonance in your heart and soul." * "Far from Moscow” is a project designed to aggregate songs and sounds (i.e., texts and tunes) over a very wide area. We also release regular compilations, dedicated to varied genres and digital material that might otherwise go unnoticed. These albums should help to slow the rate at which young and impressive performers move across the horizon. The same collections should also help to nurture new audiences, both at home and… far from Moscow. The tracks on display - this time! - come from Russia, Ukraine, and Belarus. All were published during Spring 2013. Within each file you'll find photographic, geographic, and archival information concerning the artist or band in question